Just because it's digital doesn't make it cheap.

When we're online, it's easier to find the best price, and we are bombarded by options. From a content perspective, because you can remove it, shift it, and it might only be seen by a small audience we assume we should pay less for it, or that it can be done quicker.

Content is not quick or cheap to make, ask Expedia who have consistently spent billions on their advertising per annum, in fact in 2014 it was four times their technology spend or in dollar terms 2.8 billion.

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Paying less does not mean quality, nor does it mean you're getting value for the dollar. Media is becoming busier, dedicating more time to putting together a campaign, and increasing your budgets can mean the difference between a product that your audience engages with and one that does not fit and they scroll past.

When I talk about Marketing, I mean any piece of content that communicates your brand values online to your audience and it only takes one post to really bring down a brand a notch, whether this is a mistake like the one David Jones made or a critical error in audience understanding like Pepsi made.

Content is important, how it's made is important, what your audience thinks of it is important. If you're a B2B business, and you buy, sell and develop great buildings you may find that a lot of that is word of mouth, but great photography, videography, and an authentic sales message also can align to create better brand value just look at Frasers Property as a great example of a brand that makes themselves accessible on the home page, compared to say Avenor who talk about creating space that bring people together, but fail to really demonstrate that on their homepage. Which site do you believe cost more? We'd take a guess that Fraser would have spent north of $50,000-100,000, whereas Avenor probably around spent around $20,000.

Your online presence is your brand, it's your sales pitch, it's your first point of call for most people, and everything there or missing, tells your audience, your customers, and your clients what you can do for them, and what you cannot.

— Oliver
Content Director

Oliver Minnett